BRACERS Notes

Record no. Notes, topics or text
701

Ch'en asks for BR's views on Putnam Weale, quoted in The Problem of China.

702

BR cannot remember anything about Putnam Weale but recalls Lamont's visit to China and his own dislike of the Consortium plans.

703

Chen encloses some clippings from local newspapers in Chinese (not present) and would like to send BR a reproduction of a famous Chinese painting. He pays homage and sends his thanks to the Russells for the work that they have done for world peace.



He attended BR's lectures in Peking in 1920-21.

704

BR thanks Chen for the kind things he wrote in his letter and for offering him the copy of the Chinese painting.

705

On the Sino-Indian border dispute.

706

On BR's assumptions about the German navy in "The Future of Anglo-German Rivalry" (B&R C15.15).

707

Chittenden writes intimately to BR, who took her to Canterbury and recited Shakespeare. She may be a lover.

708
709
710

On misprints in What I Believe.

711

Chow is writing a dissertation on the May Fourth Movement in China, 1919.

712

Chow asks for BR's reactions to his book on the May Fourth Movement.

713

Chown has written a manuscript on love and truth.

714

BR invited to become a vice-president of the Civil Union for the Right Understanding of International Interests, whose president is Norman Angell. BR notes his acceptance.

Also in file: a "draft letter" for a Democratic Policy Council, TL(CAR), 2 s.

715
716

An 18-year-old, Clarke says he is on the verge of committing suicide. BR has dictated a comment: "This is typical of many letters I have received."

717

BR confesses that his own youth was like Clarke's, "except that I was much more sexually inhibited." He advises him that his loneliness will diminish soon after reaching university.

718

Clark is settling his bet with BR on who would be the winner (of the U.S. Presidential election).

719

The newsclip is from the Harvard student newspaper (The Crimson) and is on the civil rights movement. There is a note in the file.

720

Clatworthy would like to sculpt BR.

721

Clark requests BR's criticisms of his and Sohn's supplement to Peace through Disarmament and Charter Revision.

722

Goldring refers to BR's "broken shoulder" and hopes BR will represent the English section at Clarté's congress at the end of April.

723

Chandler provides news of the anti-nuclear movement in Sweden.

724

Clunie encloses his review of Common Sense and Nuclear Warfare.

725

BR thanks Clunie for his review and compares the nuclear policy of the Labour Party unfavourably with that of the German Social Democratic Party.

726

Lord Coleraine thanks BR for the copy of Common Sense and Nuclear Warfare.

727

In German.

728

BR knows too little of the work of Sven Hedin to write about him.

729

Clemens would like to visit BR.

730

BR would like to see Clemens.

731

Clutton-Brock raises questions about words and meaning, sensations and images, and introspection from his reading of The Analysis of Mind.

732

Codreano sends a tribute to BR. The Analysis of Mind enabled her to theorize on physical education.

733

Coffman writes of his admiration for BR's work and asks if they could meet when he is in England in the summer of 1919.

734

The couple seeks BR's advice on sex and parenthood.

735

Cohen has seen Lotte Meitner-Graf's photograph of BR and wishes to use it to portray BR in silk. (This is the jacket photo on the first edition of BR's Autobiography.)

736

BR gives his permission for Cohen to submit her embroidery of him for the Handicrafts Exhibition.

737

Cohen's embroidery of an unidentified man is in the file. Cohen would like to know the colour of BR's eyes and of his striped shirt.

738

BR gives his permission for Cohen to make an embroidery based on his photograph by Lotte Meitner-Graf, although he has no copy to loan her.

739

This letter is written on the verso of an order form for The Legal Conscience: Selected Papers of Felix S. Cohen, who was Lucy's husband. Her father-in-law, Morris Raphael Cohen, gave her all of BR's works, including Principia Mathematica. Lucy Cohen says BR would not remember her.

740

On fanaticism.

741

On recollections of Trinity College, Cambridge, including Sedley Taylor, BR's tennis, Verrall, Sheepshanks, the hour of evacuation, Butler, and G.W. Steevens.

742

Collins wants BR to be represented in Monmouthshire Writers, vol. 2. Collins edited vol. 1 (which appeared in 1945).

743

Comfort hopes that BR will see Amulree who he says is "our top geriatrician". Comfort himself has not practised for 15 years.

744

Comfort is invited for tea on November 14, Amulree having declined. BR is writing to Exton-Smith (another physician).

745

BR sends the measurements of the Epstein bust.

746

BR is willing to lend his portrait bust to the festival.

747

BR states that letters like Chandler's "are a help and encouragement in a difficult campaign".

748

BR cannot spare the time to be sculpted, though he wishes he could.

749

Chandler encloses evidence of his "sincerity".

750

BR thanks Chandler for his "generous gift for my work" and looks forward to seeing him.

751

Chapman criticizes BR's arguments in War, The Offspring of War as a friend.

752

Chapman thinks BR is more right than wrong.

753

BR is asked again to sign a letter against British imperialist policy in China.

754

BR is thanked for his work in helping to end the Cuban Missile Crisis.

755

BR sends his standard thank-you letter on his role in the Cuban Missile Crisis.

756

Congreve is a niece of Lief Jones, Lord Rhayader. She has so enjoyed BR's BBC "portraits" that she awakes in the middle of the night "laughing aloud".

757

On China and his hope of BR advising him on his writing.

758

On BR's claim that the argument against the bomb is irrefutable.

759

BR responds that in his History he allowed for exceptions to non-irrefutability. There is a long postscript.

760

Connor is Susan Lindsay Russell's grandmother and mother of Elizabeth Conner Lindsay, who died Aug. 7, 1954.

761

The enclosed document "Aims at Introducing a Survey of the Role of Classical and Humanistic Culture in the Cultural Life of Today".

762

Werner encloses a sample of his essay writing (not present) and asks be why he cannot get published even when his work is complimented. He had submitted the essay to Ryle's Mind.

763

Werner Conway, her husband, has died at age 48.

764

Conybeare recalls their reading party "over 50 years ago" with Ray Barran, Edward Marsh, and Robert C. Trevelyan.

765

On BR's piece in the Times titled "Is Communism a Menace?" and on the reviews of Cook's book.



A note in the file states, "Fred J. Cooke—author of The Warfare State (for which BR wrote a preface)".



The photocopy of a newsclip is for a review of The Warfare State, and the document is titled "The Facts about the 1962 Space Bomb", Saturday Review, 6 April 1963.

766

BR wishes to encourage Cook to look further into the grave questions raised by the article in Aviation Week, and "the significance of the range of Russian missiles in Cuba." He asks to be kept informed of Cook's findings.

767

BR is refunded the money for unused air tickets for a trip from London to Paris.

768

On BR's reaction to a lecture by Kolman from Prague and the function of philosophy.

769

BR gives his permission for Japanese publishers to use the debate on the existence of God. He understands that there will be no royalties.

770

Corbett sends BR a copy of his book, Europe and the Social Order.

771

On being "thrown to the wolves".

772

She thanks BR for the gift of his book.

773

Cornell listened to "The Existence of God" debate on the BBC.

774

Corrick, Kingston branch secretary, asks BR to visit the committee. BR has noted: "7.18 or 19".

775

Corey cites biblical passages à propos BR's "Is a Permanent Peace Possible?".

776

This letter is written on behalf of Sylvia Pankhurst and concerns a couple who have been wrongly accused of being Communists. Corio asks for BR's help in getting the woman freed from prison so she can join her husband, who has been deported to Italy. Corio used to work for Peano setting up mathematical forms.

777

Cosstick asks if BR has written anything on Pascal that expands on his "dismissal" of him in A History of Western Philosophy.

778

On BR's opinion of Pascal, in whom BR took a great interest in adolescence in a very fine edition.

779

Costello asks about his teaching assignment in preparation for BR's arrival at Harvard.

780

Coster asks to photograph BR, since it has been many years since he photographed BR in his Essex St. studio.

781

The enclosed is a declaration based on BR's statement to the World Congress of Mathematicians.

782

On a teacher named Josef Hajda who is "carrying out a modest, energetic and highly individual campaign for peace."

783

BR lacks the address of Josef Hajda of Prague.

784

On "last night's" talk by or with BR, perhaps regarding "Mysticism and Logic" or "The Essence of Religion".

785

Counsell is going to draw BR as "puck leading the divinity professors" (for the Cambridge Magazine). (He did.)

786

Lady Courtney invites BR for a visit.

787

Cousens is teaching in the slums of Hoxton and is experimenting with her teaching methods. She is glad BR is "not being worshipped as a deity on a little island in a lotus lake".

788

The list of questions is part of Cousens' suggestions for breaking the political deadlock concerning the H-bomb. He heard BR's broadcast "the other night" on this subject and feels that BR's suggestions are the most useful.

Cousens says they last met about 1925 when he and Dorothy had a Hampstead shop selling educational apparatus.

789

Cowell congratulates BR on receiving UNESCO's Kalinga Prize and reminds BR of their discussion at the UNESCO Fourth General Conference in Paris in 1949. He asks BR about Leibniz.

790

BR is not sure there is time to do a "master mind" lecture on Leibniz before the extinction of the human race or, at any rate, of himself.

791

Cowles asks if BR's essay, "A Free Man's Worship", has been published alone or if it is in one of his books. He notes "how immensely I have enjoyed the work of yours that has appeared in American magazines the past two or three years."

792

About a possible meeting, though she is sure BR will be very busy on the 1st.

793

On BR's article "A Philosophy for You in These Times" in Reader's Digest. The letter is critical and has suffered scrunching up.

794

Patricia Russell finds Cragg's letter "impertinent and stupid". The editors omitted passages critical of the U.S.

795

Crawley writes on behalf of Sister Rosa Womersley who would like permission to attend BR's lectures on mathematical logic "this term".

796

Cripps is aware of the rumours that are being circulated and is doing what he can to contradict them. BR is at liberty to quote Cripps.

797

Crisp complains that BR's Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy lacks elementary illustrations.

798

Croome will be broadcasting on religion. She refers to BR's "caustic remarks about Catholic statisticians the other day".

799

K. Blackwell's note in the file states: "Found in Plas Penrhyn copy of Walter Bagehot's Physics and Politics (Russell's Library, no. 2732)". The only connection with BR is the reference to reaching Haslemere.

800

Cryer asks for advice regarding his pacifism.

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