3111

BRACERS Record Detail

To access the original letter, email the Ready Division.

Collection code 
RA1
Class no. 
710
Document no. 
056359
Box no. 
5.46
Source if not BR 
Recipient(s) 
BR
Sender(s) 
Smeaton, Amethe (aka)
von Zeppelin, Amethe
Date 
1917/02/08
Enclosures/References 
Form of letter 
ALS
Pieces 
2
BR's address code (if sender) 
Notes, topics or text 

Smeaton, who has left Girton because of illness, asks BR to recommend someone to instruct her in Principia.

See http://www.logicmatters.net/2012/01/06/amethe-von-zeppelin-continued/: "A generous correspondent (much better at this Googling malarkey than I) writes:" “Amethe Smeaton was the daughter of a colonial administrator (later a liberal MP) called Donald Smeaton. She was born in the late 1890s and was at Girton College during WW1 but left without graduating because of ill health. She corresponded briefly with Russell about Principia in 1917. She married a Scottish army officer called Ian McEwan in 1919: they had a son who served in the Scots Guards and who was killed in WW2. In 1924 she published in the Morning Post an adulatory account of an interview she had with Mussolini (apparently she spent time in Italy as a child and therefore spoke Italian.) Graf von Zeppelin was cited as co-respondent in her divorce in 1929: it was said that they had been “found living as Count and Countess von Zeppelin” at Mentone. She married the count in Cap Martin, France in August that year. (He had been a German army officer during WW1, then had travelled in the forests of Bolivia, publishing an account of his adventures in 1926. According to A J Ayer, he chased Otto Neurath through the streets of Munich with a revolver at one point.) They bought a house called Schloss Mauerbach near Vienna in 1939. I think she died around 1966.”

"She’d translated before, a history book by Paul Frischauer, Prince Eugene: A Man and a Hundred Years of History, first published in German in 1933, translated in 1934, and still in print. Later she translated Schlick’s Philosophy of Nature (1949), Walter Schubart’s Russia and Western Man (1950), Bruno Freytag’s Philosophical Problems of Mathematics (1951), and a book by Karl Kobald Springs of Immortal Sound (1950), on places in Austria associated with composers. She also co-translated Werner Heisenberg’s Nuclear Physics (1953). That’s a rather remarkable catalogue! And she wasn’t “just” a translator: she was competent enough to be asked to review a group of logic and philosophy of science books for Nature in 1938 (she writes the composite review in a way that indicates she was very much up with developments)."

Filed 
Published 
Russell letter no. 
Permission 
Everyone
Thread 
Reel no. 
Frame no. 
Record no. 
3111
Record created 2005/01/06
Record last modified 2015/06/15
Created/last modified by duncana